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Rio Mar Seafood http://www.riomarseafood.com A Seafood Destination Sun, 01 Jun 2014 03:59:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.14 2014 Tales of the Cocktail at RioMar, July 17th http://www.riomarseafood.com/2014/05/31/2014-tales-of-the-cocktail-at-riomar-july-17th/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2014/05/31/2014-tales-of-the-cocktail-at-riomar-july-17th/#comments Sun, 01 Jun 2014 00:44:07 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/?p=796 Spirited Dinner hosted by Sandeman Ports

On July 17th, from 7 till 10 pm, RioMar will be featuring a 5-course Tales of the Cocktail menu that will be paired with cocktails by Sandeman Ports.

View the menu here 2014 Tales of the Cocktail

Make your reservation today by calling 504-525-FISH (3474) or going to opentable.com !

We can’t wait to see you!

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We Know How to Happy Hour! http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/09/26/we-know-how-to-happy-hour/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/09/26/we-know-how-to-happy-hour/#comments Thu, 26 Sep 2013 20:58:14 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/?p=615 Every Monday through Friday from 5-7 pm enjoy:

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

 1/2-priced Cocktails and Wines by the Glass 

$5 Tapas

Ceviches

‘Al Fuego’
Gulf Shrimp, Fire-Roasted Tomato & Chiles, garnished with Popcorn

Rocoto
Scallops, Octopus, Onions, Peppers, Rocoto & Sweet Potatoes

Flor
Drum, Hibiscus Infusion, Mango & Bird Chiles

Panamanian
Drum, Habanero, Lime, & Red Onion

 

Tapas from the Sea, Garden & Land 

Grilled Louisiana Jumbo Shrimp
Smoked Tomato Alioli

Marinated Spanish Olives

Boquerones
Marinated White Anchovies

Stuffed Piquillo Pepper
Seasonal Preparation

Empanada ‘Ropas Viejas’

Medjool Dates
Stuffed with Marcona Almonds

Roasted Eggplant
With Manchego Cheese & Caperberry

Fried P&J Oysters ‘Al Ajillo’
Toasted Garlic & Lemon Sauce

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Gambas Al Ajillo http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/04/09/gambas-al-ajillo/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/04/09/gambas-al-ajillo/#comments Wed, 10 Apr 2013 05:25:40 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/?p=452 Gambas Al Ajillo- Miles Prescott, Executive Chef at RioMar

This dish has deep roots in every Spanish coastal town, but versions of it are just as common today in Cuba and Coastal Latin America as they are in the old country. As with so many other classic Latin dishes, there is a New Orleans cousin. When tucking into a bowl of Gambas, one cannot help but note it’s similarity to New Orleans BBQ Shrimp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil takes the place of Butter in a healthy divergence from our local version.

Equipment:
1 .5 Gal Sauté Pan + Lid
Tongs
Knife
Cutting Board
Serving Bowl
Discarded Shells Bowl

Ingredients:
9-12 ea U-12 Gulf Shrimp (head-on, shell peeled from bodies)
3 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil (Preferably Spanish)
2 TB Garlic (thin-sliced)
.5 ea Lemon (sliced into 5 thin discs)
2 TB Flat Leaf Parsley (chopped)
1.5 TSP Spanish Sweet Paprika
Salt, Pepper, & Crushed Chile Flake to taste
2 C White Wine (I recommend a White Rioja, Txakilona, or Albarino)
Additional 1 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Place the sauté pan over high heat. Add the 3 TB of Extra Virgin Olive oil and the Sliced Garlic. On a plate or bowl, combine the shrimp, Lemons, Paprika, Parsley, Salt, Pepper, and Chile Flake. When the garlic begins to tan in the olive oil, add the entire plate of ingredients, followed by the wine. Place the lid on top and boil for 2-3 minutes. Remove the lid to allow alcohol to burn off. After 1-2 minutes, Shrimp should be cooked through. Pour the entire contents of the pan into a serving bowl. Test for seasoning and drizzle the remaining 1 TB of Extra Virgin Olive Oil on Top. Serve immediately, preferably with crusty bread or a side of rice.

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Louisiana Black Drum http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/04/09/louisiana-black-drum/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/04/09/louisiana-black-drum/#comments Wed, 10 Apr 2013 04:55:38 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/?p=444 Louisiana Black Drum

Gulf Shrimp, Maduro Relleno, Chayote-­‐Coconut Slaw, Salsa Criolla

For the Relleno:
4 Maduros (ripe plantains)
5 LA Gulf Shrimp (’36-­‐40’ size)’
1.5 TB Nikkei Sauce*
2 sheets Parchment Paper

1. Place the plantains between the sheets of parchment paper and pound them flat with a mallet or the bottom of a small sauté pan. Form the mash into a rectangle.
2. Poach the shrimp in boiing water for 2 minutes. Cool in an ice bath. When chilled, finely chop the shrimp.
3. Remove the top sheet of parchment paper. Spread the chopped shrimp in a line across the center of the rectangular mash. Pour the Nikkei Sauce all over the mash.
4. Using the bottom parchment paper as a sushi roller, fold the mash over the shrimp and form into a tube resembling a sushi roll. Twist in the end to pack the roll tight. Refrigerate for at least one hour before serving.

Nikkei Sauce:
3 TSP Soy Sauce
1 TSP Aji Amarillo Paste
2 TSP Dijon Mustard
1.5 TSP Fresh-­‐Squeezed Lime Juice

Combine all ingredients in a mixing bowl and whisk together.

For the Chayote-­‐Coconut Relish:
1 Chayote (aka Mirliton)
.5 Cup Red Bell Pepper (seeded and finely julienned)
.25 Cup Red Onion (finely julienned)
2 TB Coconut Milk
2 TB Canned Grated Coconut
1 TB White Vinegar
1 TB EVOO
1 TSP Fresh Ginger (grated)
Salt, Pepper, & Chile Flake to taste

1. Cut the chayote into quarters. Cut out the core and slice the remainder on a mandolin at about the width of a house key.
2. In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Refrigerate for 20 minutes.

Salsa Criolla:
2TB EVOO
1 Red Onion (julienned)
1.5 TB Aji Amarillo Paste
1 OZ White Vinegar
.67 C Fresh-­‐Squeezed Lime Juice
.125 Bunch Fresh Cilantro
Salt and Pepper

1. Sweat Red Onion in EVOO over low heat until translucent.
2. Move to blender and combine all ingredients EXCEPT Cilantro. Blend until smooth.
3. Add Cilantro and pulse a few times until Cilantro is chopped up but still distinguishable from the sauce. Season to taste and refrigerate.

For the Fish:
7 OZ Fillet Black Drum (Blood-­‐Line and Pin-­‐Bones Removed)
Salt and Pepper
3 TB Cooking Oil
1 TSP Butter

1. Select a sauté pan large enough for the fish fillet to lay flat across the base. Add the cooking oil and heat until the oil
begins to smoke slightly.
2. Lay the fish into the pan and return to heat. Cook 30 seconds, then add butter and immediately move the pan into a 500 degree oven.
3. Cook 5 minutes.
Fillet should be nearly cooked through, but still a little raw on top. Remove the fish from the pan and place on a resting rack.

To Assemble the Dish:
1. Place the Relleno in a 350 degree fryer. After 4 minutes, the outside should be a deep, dark brown color. Remove and sprinkle with salt. Cut the relleno into two equal size pieces and place them in the center of the serving plate.
2. Encircle the relleno with Salsa Criolla.
3. Reheat the sauté pan for the fish until it is starting to smoke once again. Place the fish, raw side down, into the pan and finish cooking it. Remove from the pan and place it, brown side up, on top of the relleno.
4. Pinch a healthy portion of the Chayote-­‐Coconut Relish between your fingers and remove it from the dressing. Balance it on the fish fillet.

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Bazan and Prescott Become Business Partners, Owners of RioMar New Orleans, LA., http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/03/27/bazan-and-prescott-become-business-partners-owners-of-riomar-new-orleans-la/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/03/27/bazan-and-prescott-become-business-partners-owners-of-riomar-new-orleans-la/#comments Wed, 27 Mar 2013 21:21:35 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/?p=483 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Bazan and Prescott Become Business Partners, Owners of RioMar New Orleans, LA.,
March 27, 2013 — RioMar, a Spanish and Latin American seafood restaurant in the Warehouse District, is proud to announce that OwnerNick Bazan has invited Miles Prescott to be co-­‐owner in addition to his current role as executive chef. The two restaurateurs made their partnership official earlier this month.

Prescott has worked in professional kitchens since 1993 and attended The New England Culinary Institute in Vermont. He has held several managerial roles as sous chef, chef de cuisine and executive chef. His specialty is in seasonal, sustainable, farm-­‐to-­‐table cuisine executed with technique and refinement. Prescott derived these skills from years of experience in the kitchens of many great practitioners, as well as immersion in a broad array of the classic world cuisines. Prescott has garnered positive reviews from Gambit and The Times-­‐Picayune, which named him one of the “New Chefs to Watch” for 2009.

Prescott has extensive experience executing traditional Spanish and Latin American cooking techniques from his time working under Chef Adolfo Garcia at RioMar. His innate curiosity fuels his culinary exploration and his passion for traditional Spanish flavors and fresh, local ingredients are evident throughout the dishes he creates at RioMar. “I am delighted to have Miles as my new business partner as we begin this new chapter of RioMar,” said Nick Bazan, co-­‐ owner of RioMar.
“Miles has tremendous restaurant experience, in and out of the kitchen, and this is a great opportunity for him to move forward in his culinary career. He is extremely passionate about his work and I am constantly impressed by his innovation and flair for culinary artistry.”

About RioMar:
Founded in 2000, and located in the heart of the Warehouse District in New Orleans, RioMar offers fresh seafood dishes and tapas prepared with exotic flavors and Creole influence. Owner Nick Bazan and Executive Chef/Owner Miles Prescott work to showcase the bounty of the Gulf with traditional Spanish and Latin American techniques. For more information, please visit: http://www.riomarseafood.com and like RioMar on Facebook and follow it on Twitter (@riomarseafood).

Media Contact:
Uptown PR
Samantha Navarra — snavarra@uptown-­‐pr.com — 985.974.8427

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GoNOLA Top 5: Places to Get Seafood During Lent in New Orleans http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/02/28/gonola-top-5-places-to-get-seafood-during-lent-in-new-orleans/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/02/28/gonola-top-5-places-to-get-seafood-during-lent-in-new-orleans/#comments Thu, 28 Feb 2013 20:44:00 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/?p=474 Credit: GoNOLA, www.gonola.com
Written by Hartley Casbon

In an effort of full disclosure, I must admit that I am not a good Catholic. I was raised Catholic, went to Catholic school and even graduated from a Catholic university, but that doesn’t necessarily mean I’m a terribly observant Catholic. And so when Lent rolls around, I usually attempt to come up with something – anything – to give up, only to find myself breaking that Lenten promise within a matter of days.

But one aspect of Lent I seem to have no problem sticking to? Meatless Fridays. And how is that, you may ask? Easy: because I can eat as much delicious New Orleans seafood as I want AND make my mother happy at the same time. Two birds, one stone.

And just because Lent is technically supposed to be about giving something up and repentance, that doesn’t mean you can’t still have a touch of indulgence, right? So for all you practicing Catholics, non practicing Catholics and non Catholics who just happen to be jonesing for some seafood on a Friday evening in New Orleans: take note. Here are my top five picks for seafood in the city.

1. GW Fins – Fins is in their name and seafood is their game at GW Fins in the French Quarter. This upscale New Orleans seafood restaurant exceeds expectations with their largely locally sourced and supremely fresh seafood, all prepared in-house with vibrant sauces and garnishes. Their Asian inspired yellow fin tuna and wahoo, when in season, are stand outs on the menu, but you really can’t go wrong with any of their delicious dishes paired with carefully selected sides. If you need further convincing, GW Fins’ genious chef Tenney Flynn won New Orleans Magazine’s Chef of the Year in 2011 and he’s on the Louisiana Seafood Chefs Council, in case you were wondering the quality of their credentials.

2. Rio Mar Seafood Restaurant – For those looking to observe Lent in a more upscale environment, swing by Rio Mar, located in the Warehouse District. The menu created by award winning Chef Adolfo Garcia is heavily influenced by his Spanish and Latin American heritage while still showcasing the very best in local produce and Gulf seafood. Added bonus – the dim lighting and a sleek interior make this an ideal date spot. Rio Mar is located at 800 S. Peters St. and can be reached at 504.525.3474.

3. Pascal’s Manale – Barbecue Shrimp is arguably one of the greatest inventions in all of New Orleans cuisine, and it all came from the kitchen at Pascal’s Manale. For those not familiar with the iconic dish, it’s a far cry from what we typically think of when we think of barbecue. The shrimp are served head-on in a broth-like sauce of spicy buttery amazingness with tons of French bread for dipping – because dipping is more civilized than just drinking the sauce, which you’ll likely be tempted to do. Pascal Manale’s is located at 1838 Napoleon Ave. and can be reached at 504-895-4877.

4. High Hat Cafe – High Hat is among the outstanding restaurants to pop up along the stretch of Freret Street between Napoleon and Jefferson avenues. The menu is all about southern comfort – most notably their crispy thin fried catfish plates. Be sure to order a side of their sweet potato salad, and be on the lookout for their Satsuma Lemonade, which is downright addictive when they have it. High Hat is located at 4500 Freret St. and can be reached at 504.754.1336.

5. Big Fisherman Seafood – Want to enjoy seafood like a true local? They swing by Big Fisherman Seafood, pick up a few pounds of boiled crawfish (or shrimp), ask them to throw in a few potatoes, garlic and corn – and a crab or two for good measure – then head to The Fly up by Audubon Park to enjoy your picnic feast. You should also swing by Breaux Mart right across the street to pick up some beer and a whole lot of paper towels (you’ll need them). Also be sure to grab some newspaper to pour the crawfish out on – and remember, the more sturdy of a base you lay down, the easier your clean up will be. Big Fisherman is located at 3301 Magazine St. and can be reached at 504.897.9907.

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There is a New Chef in Town- Miles Prescott Named RioMar’s Executive Chef http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/01/28/there-is-a-new-chef-in-town-miles-prescott-named-riomars-executive-chef/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/01/28/there-is-a-new-chef-in-town-miles-prescott-named-riomars-executive-chef/#comments Mon, 28 Jan 2013 21:03:43 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/?p=480 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

There is a New Chef in Town
Miles Prescott Named RioMar’s Executive Chef

New Orleans, LA., January 28, 2013 — RioMar, a Spanish and Latin American seafood restaurant in the Warehouse District, has named Miles Prescott as its Executive Chef. Prescott was awarded this new title after serving as Chef de Cuisine under Chef Adolfo Garcia at RioMar, along with his extended experience working with some of the country’s other top chefs.

Prescott attended The New England Culinary Institute in Vermont and has worked in professional kitchens since 1993. He specializes in seasonal, sustainable, farm-­‐to-­‐table cuisine executed with technique and refinement. He derived these skills from years of experience in the kitchens of many great practitioners, as well as immersion in a broad array of the classic world cuisines. Prescott has worked with David Snyder of Halyards in Georgia; John Gorham of Tasty & Sons and Toro in Oregon; Andrew Zimmerman of Sepia in Chicago; Susan Spicer of Bayona, Tom Wolfe of Wolfe’s, and Chris DeBarr of Serendipity here in New Orleans. His first turn as Executive Chef came in 2007 at The Country Club, where he garnered positive reviews from Gambit Weekly and The Times-­‐Picayune, which named him one of the New Chefs to Watch for 2009.

During his time working under Chef Adolfo Garcia, Prescott perfected his traditional Spanish and Latin American cooking techniques. He continues to draw from his travels and experience as Sous Chef of Del Toro, Chicago’s first authentic Catalon Tapas restaurant. His innate curiosity fuels his culinary exploration and his passion for traditional Spanish flavors and fresh, local ingredients are evident throughout the dishes he creates at RioMar.

About RioMar: Founded in 2000, and located in the heart of the Warehouse District in New Orleans,
RioMar offers fresh seafood dishes and tapas with exotic flavors and Creole flair. Owner Nicolas Bazan III and Executive Chef Miles Prescott work to showcase the bounty of the Gulf with traditional Spanish and Latin American techniques. For more information, please visit: http://www.riomarseafood.com and like RioMar on
Facebook and follow it on Twitter (@riomarseafood).

Media Contact: Uptown PR Samantha Navarra — snavarra@uptown-­‐pr.com — 985.974.8427

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Miles Prescott is Now Executive Chef at Rio Mar http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/01/28/miles-prescott-is-now-executive-chef-at-rio-mar/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/01/28/miles-prescott-is-now-executive-chef-at-rio-mar/#comments Mon, 28 Jan 2013 20:42:29 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/?p=468 Credit: Eater, www.nola.eater.com
Written by Gwendolyn Knapp

chef_milesRio Mar announces that Miles Prescott is their new Executive Chef. Back in July, Brett Anderson revealed that Chef Adolfo Garcia was peacing out of his flagship Latin/seafood restaurant in the Warehouse District by selling his shares to business partner Nick Bazan III. Around that same time Miles Prescott was announced as chef du Cuisine, a position he’d held several years back under Garcia, and has been holding down again since July. In fact, he’s basically been running the kitchen over there, so it’s no surprise he’s finally Executive Chef.

Prescott attended The New England Culinary Institute in Vermont and has worked in professional kitchens since 1993. He’s also worked under Susan Spicer and Chris DeBarr, and had a successful run in the kitchen at The Country Club in the Bywater a few years back.

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Where Y’Eat: A Sea Change at RioMar http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/01/10/where-yeat-a-sea-change-at-riomar/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2013/01/10/where-yeat-a-sea-change-at-riomar/#comments Thu, 10 Jan 2013 20:31:48 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/?p=463 Credit: 89.90 WMNO, www.wwno.org
Written by Ian McNulty

It’s long been the downtown destination for Latin-style seafood. But more recently, RioMar has also become an ongoing exploration of a nebulous question for the restaurant world — in our age of high-profile chefs, what happens to a restaurant when its name chef moves on?

Red snapper with both local crabmeat and a Peruvian style sauce.

Red snapper with both local crabmeat and a Peruvian style sauce.

Two entwined but distinct threads have always guided RioMar, a long-running restaurant in the Warehouse District. One is the food of the Spanish-speaking world, from the ham-obsessions of central Spain all the way to the hot peppers and tropical fish of Madrid’s onetime colonies. The other was the life journey of chef Adolfo Garcia, a New Orleans native from a Panamanian family who trained in Spain and had a story for every dish on his menu, whether that story sprang from a tapas bar in Seville or a strip mall taco joint in Kenner.

But Garcia left RioMar last year to focus on his many newer restaurant ventures. Since then, RioMar has become an ongoing exploration of a nebulous question for the restaurant world — in our age of high-profile chefs, what happens to a restaurant when its name chef moves on? That’s a question that would have very rarely come up just a generation or two ago, when individual chefs at most restaurants had far less acclaim and restaurant customers were less likely to track their career moves.

But that was then. And today, it matters that the torch at RioMar has been passed to one of Garcia’s protégés, the chef Miles Prescott. His answer to the succession issue has been to keep following RioMar’s pan-Hispanic culinary direction while adding his own accents.

The changes are hardly sweeping. Just like before, you still can get the signature four-ceviche sampler, or the short-grain rice cooked with squid and its black ink, or the falling-apart roasted pork with plantains and rice and beans or the Gulf fish escabeche, covered with an oily, pickled relish that presses the same kind of flavor buttons as an olive salad.

One of those four ceviches, though, is now made with coconut milk, which gives a still-tart but mellow, creamy flavor in a way that’s better tuned to cooler weather. One recent special was red snapper grilled skin-on and topped with sweet crab knuckles and a green, garlicky sauce hailing from Peru. At dessert, a golden Galician crepe was wrapped around basil and honey sabayon with apples cooked in sherry and cinnamon. Bacalao, the Spanish salt cod, remains a specialty here, whipped into a casserole or maybe sliced over greens with torn hunks of crusty bread. If salt cod seems archaic in our age of flash-freezing and overnight deliveries this properly-done version shows how ancient methods of food preservation can endure in a cuisine on their own delicious merits. Just think hams or pickles for two more familiar examples.

During the lunch shift, RioMar essentially functions as a Spanish tapas bar patronized by big office parties and conventioneers with a nose for sniffing out garlic. In the afternoons, when much of the rest of its block is closed behind heavy shutters, groups inside RioMar pass around terracotta bowls of grilled octopus and garlic shrimp or plates of Iberian ham, blood sausage and white anchovies.

I do miss some of the old chef’s dishes, and I miss Garcia’s ebullient presence in what had been his flagship. But with such a diverse range of Spanish and Latin American source material up for reinterpretation, I’m also looking forward to what happens here next.

RioMar

800 S. Peters St., 525-3474
www.riomarseafood.com

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Panamanian style Ceviche http://www.riomarseafood.com/2010/03/10/panamanian-style-ceviche/ http://www.riomarseafood.com/2010/03/10/panamanian-style-ceviche/#comments Wed, 10 Mar 2010 16:22:12 +0000 http://www.riomarseafood.com/site/?p=110 Ceviche is our calling card. We serve four different types each night.

Ingredients – (Serves 4)

1 pound freshest available Louisiana fish filet
1 large red onion
2 ea. Habanero peppers
1 cup fresh squeezed lime juice
Salt to taste
12 ea. salt crackers

Dice fish into quarter by quarter inches. Place into a glass or stainless steel bowl. Small dice the onions, squeeze limes and fine dice the habeneros. Add all the ingredients together and season to taste with salt. Chill for 3-4 hours, taste again for salt and serve with crackers.

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